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View Full Version : Opening Ports 2078 &/Or 2077



wgedward
02-13-2008, 03:27 PM
I have disabled all firewalls (both CA and MS) and still get an error message that states I can not access my "WEB-Disk" due to ports 2078 and 2077 not being open. How can I be sure that the ports are in fact open and what else would cause the WEB-Disk not to install/open?

Bill

John
02-13-2008, 06:37 PM
I have disabled all firewalls (both CA and MS) and still get an error message that states I can not access my "WEB-Disk" due to ports 2078 and 2077 not being open. How can I be sure that the ports are in fact open and what else would cause the WEB-Disk not to install/open?

Bill

You shouldn't be running more than one firewall. If you have windows firewall, stick to that (unless there's a reason I'm not aware of that you're using all those firewalls?)

Also, I enabled ports in my firewall, but then I bumped into a "Bad Certificate" problem. I gave up on installilng the certificate in the certicate root thing. I use Win Vista Home.

I gave up. I can't imagine how Webdisk would make things easier since I'm using Dreamweaver for ftp and such.

shadmego
02-13-2008, 06:56 PM
I have disabled all firewalls (both CA and MS) and still get an error message that states I can not access my "WEB-Disk" due to ports 2078 and 2077 not being open. How can I be sure that the ports are in fact open and what else would cause the WEB-Disk not to install/open?

Bill

If you are behind a router, then you will have to forward the port to your computer's ip address. The reason for this is typically, routers will translate your private IP address into a public one to conform to Internet rules. The traffic coming back has to know where to go. Forwarding the ports for WebDisk will help the router know where to send the traffic so you have complete the connection.

~regards

shadmego
02-13-2008, 07:03 PM
You shouldn't be running more than one firewall. If you have windows firewall, stick to that (unless there's a reason I'm not aware of that you're using all those firewalls?)

Also, I enabled ports in my firewall, but then I bumped into a "Bad Certificate" problem. I gave up on installilng the certificate in the certicate root thing. I use Win Vista Home.

I gave up. I can't imagine how Webdisk would make things easier since I'm using Dreamweaver for ftp and such.

I would actually advise not using the Windows Firewall. Though it is a step in the right direction, it is not a bidirectional firewall. It only blocks traffic coming inbound. It does nothing to traffic in the outbound direction. Understanding this makes me question why they call it a firewall in the first place. If anyone has the means, I would definately recommend a third party firewall to protect your local computer.

You are correct though, it would be best to run only one firewall, though running two will not mess your system up like running two anti-virus/spam filters will. It is common for larger businesses to run multiple firewalls and Intrusion Detection Systems on their networks. They typically use a combination of hardware and software firewalls.

As far as your certificate errors, you are getting these because you are most likely connecting to your domain name (expected) using a secure protocol. Since you are on a shared host and don't have your own SSL certificate, your are using the host default certificate which is in the name of hostXX.hostmonster.com. This is because the certificate is created using the name of the host. So connecting to https://www.yourdomain.com would produce a certificate error (name mismatch) when trying to connect using a secure protocol. If you connect using the domain name https://hostXX.hostmonster.com/~username, then you would not run into the certificate issues you mentioned.

~regards

John
02-14-2008, 02:19 AM
I would actually advise not using the Windows Firewall. Though it is a step in the right direction, it is not a bidirectional firewall. It only blocks traffic coming inbound. It does nothing to traffic in the outbound direction. Understanding this makes me question why they call it a firewall in the first place. If anyone has the means, I would definately recommend a third party firewall to protect your local computer.

You are correct though, it would be best to run only one firewall, though running two will not mess your system up like running two anti-virus/spam filters will. It is common for larger businesses to run multiple firewalls and Intrusion Detection Systems on their networks. They typically use a combination of hardware and software firewalls.

As far as your certificate errors, you are getting these because you are most likely connecting to your domain name (expected) using a secure protocol. Since you are on a shared host and don't have your own SSL certificate, your are using the host default certificate which is in the name of hostXX.hostmonster.com. This is because the certificate is created using the name of the host. So connecting to https://www.yourdomain.com would produce a certificate error (name mismatch) when trying to connect using a secure protocol. If you connect using the domain name https://hostXX.hostmonster.com/~username, then you would not run into the certificate issues you mentioned.

~regards

That was amazing, shad. Thank you.

Ammann G. Eric
12-24-2008, 07:26 AM
I must disable the firewalls on the gates 2078 and 2077. How do I do that ?

Eric

RDM
12-24-2008, 08:17 AM
I must disable the firewalls on the gates 2078 and 2077. How do I do that ?

Eric

You'll have to get a dedicated IP address ($30/year) to open up ports. Talk to HM support.